Cost of Hydroelectricity in Canada 2022

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As the second-largest producer of hydroelectricity aka hydro in the world, Canada’s electricity sector is striving on different sources. The cost of electricity in Canada varies based on different factors. The province you reside in, the source of electricity, among many other factors affect the cost of electricity in Canada.

Electricity in Canada

Electricity, popularly known as hydro in Canada, is an essential source of energy that we all need for survival all over the world. We all depend on electricity for our daily activities. Most of our household equipment like the blender, dishwasher and washing machine all depend on electricity.

Electric cars are the new advancement in the use of electricity. As a country advances technologically and its economy develops, the demand for electricity grows rapidly. The sources of electricity and technology used to generate electricity have changed over the years.

Most electricity is generated with steam turbines using fossil fuels, nuclear, biomass, geothermal solar thermal energy. All over the world, electricity supply and price are regulated by governments of respective countries.

Apart from Hydroelectricity which accounts for about 59.3% of Canada’s electricity supply, other sources for electricity in Canada include:

  • Non-hydro renewable sources
  • Uranium
  • Natural gas
  • Wind
  • Coal
  • Biomass
  • Solar
  • Petroleum

Home Appliances that Consumes Energy

  • Central Air Conditioner
  • Water Heater
  • Refrigerator
  • Dryer
  • Oven Range
  • Lighting 4-5 room household
  • Dishwasher
  • Television
  • Microwave
  • Washing Machine

Cost of Electricity in Canada

In Canada, there are a number of factors that influence the price of electricity. They include:

  • Fixed costs and variable costs
  • Geography of the region
  • Source of generation
  • Maintenance and renewal of infrastructure

The price of electricity in Canada is only a fraction of your household budget. An average Canadian spends about CA$3.59 per day on electricity. Most Canadians spend more money on clothing and footwear than they do on electricity.

The average price of electricity for residential use in Canada is CA$0.174 per KWh (Kilowatt hour) with the inclusion of the territories. Excluding the territories, the average price is CA$0.135. This is based on the average monthly consumption of 1000 KWh. That is, in a month, the average price of electricity in Canada is CA$174 including the territories and, CA$135 excluding the territories.

Below is a table of the average residential cost of electricity in each province in Canada based on the average monthly consumption of 1000 KWh.


Province

Cost Per Kwh

Cost Per Kwh (Monthly)

Alberta

CA$0.167

CA$167

British Columbia

CA$0.124

CA$124

Manitoba

CA$0.096

CA$96

New Brunswick

CA$0.127

CA$127

Newfoundland and Labrador

CA$0.138

CA$138

Nova Scotia

CA$0.150

CA$150

North-West Territories

CA$0.387

CA$387

Nunavut

CA$0.375

CA$375

Ontario

CA$0.125

CA$125

Prince Edward Island

CA$0.168

CA$168

Province

Cost Per Kwh

Cost Per Kwh (Monthly)

Quebec

CA$0 .073

CA$73

Saskatchewan

CA$0.182

CA$182

Yukon

CA$0.145

CA$145

Quebec currently has the cheapest cost of electricity, followed by Manitoba. The Northwest territories have the most expensive electricity price followed by Nunavut.

Electricity Source per Province in Canada

Regulation of electricity in Canada occurs at provincial levels and the regulations include pricing as well as types of power generation used. Currently, in Canada, electricity is generated and distributed by either publicly or privately owned utilities or both, as in the cases of Alberta and Ontario.

Deregulated wholesale electricity markets can only be found in Alberta and Ontario. Different provinces in Canada use different sources for the generation of electricity.

In British Columbia, Manitoba, Quebec, Newfoundland and Labrador, and Yukon, more than 80% of electricity is generated from hydropower.

In Ontario, New Brunswick, and the Northwestern territories, a combination of nuclear, hydro, wind, biomass, coal, natural gas, and petroleum is used in generating electricity.

In Alberta, Saskatchewan, Nova Scotia, and Nunavut, they generate the majority of their electricity from fossil fuels like coal, natural gas, or petroleum.

With the increase in demand for electricity, Canada’s electricity sector has noted a 5% growth since 2015, and currently exports about 9% of the electricity it generates to the United States.

Electricity Production per Province and Source

Hydro

60.2% of Canada’s electricity is generated from Hydro. Below are details of provinces that generate electricity from hydroelectricity.

ProvinceElectricity Supply
Manitoba96.8%
Quebec95.0%
Newfoundland and Labrador93.7%
Yukon92.2%
British Columbia90.5%
Northwest Territories38.5%
Ontario25.9%
New Brunswick19.6%
Saskatchewan13.7%
Nova Scotia8.8%
Alberta2.5%

Nuclear

About 14.6% of Canada’s electricity is generated from Nuclear. Below is the distribution per province that generates electricity from nuclear.

ProvinceElectricity Supply
Ontario58.6%
New Brunswick36.1%

Wind

Wind makes up about 4.4% of Canada’s electricity generation. Below is the provincial supply from wind.

ProvinceElectricity Supply
Prince Edward Island97.9%
Nova Scotia11.8%
Ontario6.7%
New Brunswick6.6%
Alberta5.4%
Quebec3.9%
Saskatchewan3.8%
Manitoba2.7%
Northwest Territories2.0%
British Columbia1.3%
Newfoundland and Labrador 0.5%

Biomass

1.8% of Canada’s electricity is from Biomass. Below is the provincial supply from Biomass in Canada.

ProvinceElectricity Supply
Prince Edward Island0.7%
Nova Scotia4.9%
Ontario1.3%
New Brunswick4.2%
Alberta2.2%
Quebec0.8%
Manitoba0.1%
British Columbia6.4%
Newfoundland and Labrador 0.3%

Natural Gas

Natural gas constitutes 8.6% of Canada’s electricity generation.

ProvinceElectricity Supply
Alberta42.2%
Saskatchewan35.7%
Nova Scotia14.3%
New Brunswick9.9%
Ontario5.2%
Northwest Territories4.0%
Yukon2.0%
British Columbia1.1%
Newfoundland and Labrador0.7%
Quebec0.1%

Petroleum

1.2% of Canada’s electricity is generated from Petroleum.

ProvinceElectricity Supply
Nunavut100%
Northwest Territories55.3%
Nova Scotia12.2%
Yukon5.5%
Newfoundland and Labrador4.8%
Alberta2.6%
Prince Edward Island1.1%
British Columbia0.7%
Quebec0.2%
Manitoba0.2%
Ontario0.1%

Solar

Solar makes up 0.5% of Canada’s electricity generation. Below is the provincial supply from solar in Canada.

ProvinceElectricity Supply
Ontario2.2%
Prince Edward Island0.3%
Yukon0.3%
Northwest Territories0.2%
Saskatchewan0.1%
Alberta0.1%
Nova Scotia0.03%

Coal

8.6% of Canada’s electricity is generated via coal.

ProvinceElectricity Supply
Nova Scotia47.9%
Saskatchewan46.6%
Alberta44.9%
New Brunswick15.8%
Manitoba0.1%

Other Sources

ProvinceElectricity Supply
Alberta0.2%
Nova Scotia0.2%

Electricity Distribution Company per Province in Canada

The use of electricity in Canada differs greatly by province. Provinces like British Columbia and Quebec with cheap and plentiful electricity from large-scale electricity projects tend to use more electricity per person when compared with other provinces that rely on other alternative sources of energy for things like heating their homes and water.

Below is a table of some electric utilities in Canada, their type and provinces by size:

NameTypeProvince
Hydro QuebecPublicQuebec
Hydro OnePublic/PrivateOntario
Ontario Power Generation PublicOntario
Bc HydroPublicBritish Columbia 
Alectra UtilitiesMunicipalOntario
EnmaxMunicipalAlberta 
Trans AltaInvestor-Owned Alberta 
Toronto HydroMunicipalOntario
AtcoPrivateAlberta
Bruce PowerPrivateOntario 
EpcorMunicipalAlberta 
Capital Power Corporation PrivateAlberta 
Manitoba HydroPublic Manitoba 
NB Power PublicNew Brunswick 
Sask PowerPublicSaskatchewan 
Nova Scotia Power PrivateNova Scotia 
Hydro OttawaMunicipalOntario
Newfoundland And Labrador HydroPublicNewfoundland And Labrador 
Saskatoon Light& Power MunicipalSaskatchewan 
Cornwall ElectricPublicOntario

Most of the public-owned utilities have integrated services, that is, they generate and distribute electricity. While the privately-owned utilities sometimes deal with generations but are mostly involved in transportation and distribution of electricity. The municipal utilities are mainly for the distribution of electricity.

Energy Saving Tips

  • Get a prepared electric bill plan
  • Find and seal leaks around the house
  • Use a programmable thermostat
  • Cover drafty windows
  • Use less hot water
  • Unplug appliance when not in use
  • Replace air filters
  • Extra-insulate your room

Generally, electricity is considered cheap in Canada as you only spend a small percentage of your monthly budget on it. Bear in mind that depending on all the factors that influence the price of electricity, the price is not constant and can change based on provincial policies.

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Kareena Maya is a freelance writer focused on the personal finance and travel spaces. He frequently writes about credit cards, banking, student loans, insurance, travel rewards and more. His work has been featured in publications such as Forbes Advisor, Bankrate, Credit Karma, Finance Buzz, The Ascent and Student Loan Planner.

Kareena Maya is a freelance writer focused on the personal finance and travel spaces. He frequently writes about credit cards, banking, student loans, insurance, travel rewards and more. His work has been featured in publications such as Forbes Advisor, Bankrate, Credit Karma, Finance Buzz, The Ascent and Student Loan Planner.