What is Pre-Delivery Inspection (PDI)?

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Purchasing a car is a huge milestone. Most people save towards this, while others take out loans to finance their car purchase. Regardless of what means you use to purchase your car, carrying out due diligence is very important.

So how do you ensure that the vehicle you are buying is not a Lemon? Yes, you do not want to end up with a lemon car. Before finalizing a car purchase, the vehicle will go through a final check known as a Pre-Delivery Inspection (PDI). This article will be reviewing what pre-delivery inspection is in Canada and the procedures involved.

Pre-Delivery Inspection in Canada

A Pre-Delivery Inspection (PDI) is the final check carried out before selling a car, regardless of whether it is brand new or pre-owned. A PDI is always included in the dealership agreement when purchasing a vehicle. It is a thorough inspection of the car to ensure its in a top mechanical and operational condition.

A PDI for a used vehicle involves the initial inspection, all maintenance, repairs, and other follow-up inspection. It is aimed at giving customers assurance and confidence in the car they are purchasing.

During a PDI, the vehicle is examined thoroughly to ensure that it works mechanically with no issues. And also to certify that it is ready and safe to be driven on the road.

When buying a brand new, the car will not have been given a pre-delivery inspection even if it’s already in stock and available. The PDI will only be carried out when the vehicle is ordered and arrives at the deport or dealership.

Pre-Delivery Inspection Procedure

Pre-delivery inspection of every car is not the same; it varies depending on the manufacturer. A PDI examines the significant component of a vehicle. Below is a list of procedures a PDI will include:

  • Wheels examination

A PDI will examine the wheels of the vehicle. It is crucial to ensure that the locking nuts are correctly tightened. It will also check that the tyres are inflated to the recommended levels.

  • Exterior examination

An inspection of the exterior light of the vehicle will be done to check if they are working. The alignment of the headlights will also be corrected if necessary.

  • Safety review

A safety review is part of a PDI to check the car’s lock and unlock features. Other safety features like the seat belts and the dashboard warning lights will also be checked to see if they are working as intended.

  • Interior examination

The car’s coolant, engine oil, and washer fluids levels will be inspected. Also, toppings will be done if necessary.

  • General inspection

A general inspection will be done to check for any damages.

  • Clean-up

A final clean-up of the car inside and out before the buyer collects it. All the equipment fitted to a vehicle to protect it from damage during transit, like bodywork wrapping and suspension block, will be removed.

Pre-Delivery Inspection Duration

The duration a PDI takes depends on how thorough and comprehensive the inspections are. Generally, a PDI takes about one-two hours to complete, and it is usually carried out by the dealership you are buying and collecting the vehicle from before you’re handed the car keys.

Your car might be driven during a pre-delivery inspection because some of the examinations will require the vehicle to be stationary. A part of the inspection will involve a drive on the road to ascertain its balancing. Other factors like vibrating or pulling steering and the anti-lock braking system will also be assessed.

It is to learn how the car behaves and if it is in good condition. This test drive is why new cars have some miles on the clock when you collect them. Note that the distance covered during this test drive varies depending on the manufacturer.

Conclusion

A pre-delivery inspection is a final assessment a car must undergo before it is handed over to its owner. And not unless a mistake has been made during the manufacturing process, the vehicle will still be in the exact specification you ordered it after a PDI. If there are any differences, it is usually minor and will be rectified during the assessment process.

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Kareena Maya

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Kareena Maya is a freelance writer focused on the personal finance and travel spaces. He frequently writes about credit cards, banking, student loans, insurance, travel rewards and more. His work has been featured in publications such as Forbes Advisor, Bankrate, Credit Karma, Finance Buzz, The Ascent and Student Loan Planner.

Kareena Maya is a freelance writer focused on the personal finance and travel spaces. He frequently writes about credit cards, banking, student loans, insurance, travel rewards and more. His work has been featured in publications such as Forbes Advisor, Bankrate, Credit Karma, Finance Buzz, The Ascent and Student Loan Planner.